Four Ways to Handle a Detour – What’s yours?


WOOHOO!  I’m beyond happy to share with you that I have officially launched my website! YAY! HAPPY DANCE!  JIGGITY-JIG!  It has been a long time coming!  There have been many “detours” en route to its completion (and there will be many more NEW roads to build in it as we grow), but V.1 of “Make a Choice to Have a Voice” is LIVE!

While I’m totally tickled with how cool it looks, I’m even MORE excited about all the value and ideas the site will offer YOU!  My vision is for this website to be a resource for you to find inspiration and instruction from experts as you travel down your own road of life. (More details on that next time I write…)

20150413_150347Now, as you go from Point A to Point B throughout your day, you might encounter the big dreaded reflective sign that say “Lane Closed Ahead” which is followed by the next big orange diamond with the “Flagger Ahead” symbol-guy on it.  What do you do?  Do you have a mini panic attack thinking, “[Expletive], this is going to make me late for sure!”? While that may be true on the street, there are four ways to handle a detour in this journey called Life.  You can choose to:

1. Stop, evaluate, and turn around.

When you come up to a lane of traffic 20 cars deep, sometimes the best option is to just pull a U-turn. Obviously, something ahead is going to be tough – or flat out dangerous – to get around, and it may be better for you and all those involved to go back the other way. There is nothing wrong with deciding that something is not the direction you want to go.  You have the option to evaluate the situation and make a choice.

2. Ignore warnings and drive into the danger zone.

If we’re not paying attention, we might not even see the signs and just plow on forward into something that could be very detrimental.  We might be blinded by wanting something so badly or in such a hurry to get there, that we forget to take the risks into consideration.  Warning cones and detours are there for a reason, and unless we slow down, take the blinders off, and look at what’s ahead, there could be a very negative effect on our lives.

3. Follow the detour in anger and frustration.

Sitting in traffic and waiting to be redirected around a construction zone can be very annoying, I’ll admit – especially when cars are moving ahead of you, and then the line stops right when you get to the front of it! UGH!  More waiting… before finally getting to the road that loops around the mess.  Who does it hurt the most when you’re angry and frustrated?  The flagger-guy sure doesn’t care.  If you find yourself in this situation, and this is indeed the direction you want to take, it will serve you better to take a deep breath and realize that there will be bumps on the road to your destination, and you may as well make the best of it.

4. Take the new route and enjoy the scenery.

This is not to say you should ignore the problem in front of you, but rather make a choice to put it in the proper perspective.  Get in line and go with the flow, and look for the positive aspects of the detour. Truly, if we can stay in the higher energy frame of mind, and focus on the desired outcome, resources will come to our aid to help us through to the other side.  When we realize there is something we were meant to see and do and learn on the detour, it makes taking the side route much more pleasant.

In reality, when all that construction is done, the finished product will be well worth the wait and extra effort. Just like my new website and blog!  Seriously, there have been more bumps and stalls and ditches and “lanes closed ahead” than I imagined on this road, but I know there is value and purpose here – and YOU are the reason I keep driving forward!

What detours are you facing – and how are you getting through them?  I invite you to comment below… and be sure to subscribe for updates so we stay on the same path.

Until next time, Make a Choice to Have a Voice!

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